2022 MLB draft guide – Best fits, system strengths and weaknesses for all 30 teams

2022 MLB draft guide – Best fits, system strengths and weaknesses for all 30 teams post thumbnail image

The 2022 MLB draft is less than a week away. This year’s 20-round format will take place from July 17 to 19 in conjunction with Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game festivities in Los Angeles.

Here is a guide for all 30 teams, with each organization’s greatest needs, the best fits in the draft, each team’s typical approach, where each farm system ranks (updated this week!) and more.

Teams are listed in draft order.

Draft coverage: Mock Draft 2.0 | Top 300

Watch: Sunday at 7 p.m. ET on ESPN

Jump to a franchise:

American League
BAL | BOS | CHW | CLE | DET
HOU | KC | LAA | MIN | NYY
OAK | SEA | TB | TEX | TOR

National League
ARI | ATL | CHC | CIN | COL
LAD | MIA | MIL | NYM | PHI
PIT | SD | SF | STL | WSH


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 1 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 2 ($294 million)

Biggest system strengths: High-end position players

Biggest system needs: Depth of starting pitchers

How they typically draft: The Orioles tend to lean safe with position players up top then act more boldly with position players in the next few big-dollar picks while mixing in pitchers at some point.

Best fits: There are lots of players who fit their after-the-first-round type: Vanderbilt RF Spencer Jones, Tennessee RF Jordan Beck, Oregon State CF Jacob Melton, Oklahoma SS Peyton Graham, Cal RF Dylan Beavers, Louisville C Dalton Rushing, Florida CF Jud Fabian, VCU 3B Tyler Locklear, Illinois State CF Ryan Cermak

Past five first-round picks: CF Colton Cowser (2021); RF Heston Kjerstad (2020); C Adley Rutschman (2019); RHP Grayson Rodriguez (2018); SS Cadyn Grenier (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 2 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 11 ($229 million)

Biggest system strengths: Quality upper minors depth

Biggest system needs: Catching

How they typically draft: The Diamondbacks prefer to focus on contact-oriented up-the-middle position players and also lean toward higher-arm slot pitchers.

Best fits: Coastal Carolina SS Eric Brown, Prep C Brady Neal, Clemson 3B Max Wagner, Arkansas RHP Peyton Pallette, Oklahoma State RHP Justin Campbell

Past five first-round picks: SS Jordan Lawlar (2021); RHP Bryce Jarvis (2020); OF Corbin Carroll (2019); LHP Blake Walston (2019); RHP Brennan Malone (2019)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 3 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 9 ($252 million)

Biggest system strengths: Every-day-level infielders

Biggest system needs: Upper minors outfielders

How they typically draft: In a recent shift, the Rangers have been leaning to safer college types at their high picks then shifting to riskier prep players in the following rounds.

Best fits: The No. 3 overall pick will likely be one of the top four prospects on my board. Their next pick is 109th overall, and the Rangers could spend about $1 million if they include their 5% overage. I’ll project some upside prep players that could get there: RHP Jacob Zibin, SS Max Martin, RHP Karson Milbrant, C Lamar King and CF Jordan Taylor.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Jack Leiter (2021); 2B Justin Foscue (2020); 3B Josh Jung (2019); 3B Davis Wendzel (2019); RHP Cole Winn (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 4 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 5 ($289 million)

Biggest system strengths: Impact position players

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: This will sound familiar because a number of teams are doing this now, particularly when they pick high and have a big bonus pool: pretty safe position players, leaning college with high picks and riskier prep overpays down the board.

Best fits: Prep RHPs Owen Murphy, J.R. Ritchie, Walter Ford and LHPs Noah Schultz, Jackson Ferries, position players C Brady Neal, CF Henry Bolte, SS Mikey Romero

Past five first-round picks: C Henry Davis (2021); 2B Nick Gonzales (2020); RHP Quinn Priester (2019); OF Sammy Siani (2019); OF Travis Swaggerty (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 5 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 26 ($106 million)

Biggest system strengths: High-upside talent

Biggest system needs: MLB-ready position players

How they typically draft: More than almost any other team, the Nats love to take bold, upside swings of all types with their first pick. They tend toward injured or relief risk college pitchers more than other teams do with later picks. And often Scott Boras clients.

Best fits: RHP Kumar Rocker, SS Peyton Graham, prep LHP Noah Schultz, RHP Peyton Pallette, LHP Carson Whisenhunt

Past five first-round picks: SS Brady House (2021); RHP Cade Cavalli (2020); RHP Jackson Rutledge (2019); RHP Mason Denaburg (2018); LHP Seth Romero (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 6 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 7 ($257 million)

Biggest system strengths: Upper minors starting pitching

Biggest system needs: Corner power bats

How they typically draft: The Marlins’ 2020 draft consisted of all pitchers, while the top five picks of both their 2019 and 2021 drafts were position players. The Fish are practical and get a nice mix of players.

Best fits: The Marlins are very likely to take a position player with their first pick, and then at pick 46, the board will be giving them the back of the second-tier of prep pitchers (Jacob Miller, Owen Murphy, J.R. Ritchie) and college pitchers (Peyton Pallette, Carson Whisenhunt, Landon Sims, Jake Bennett, Drew Thorpe).

Past five first-round picks: SS Kahlil Watson (2021); RHP Max Meyer (2020); OF JJ Bleday (2019); OF Kameron Misner (2019); OF Connor Scott (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 7 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 16 ($198 million)

Biggest system strengths: Potential impact position players

Biggest system needs: Starting pitching depth

How they typically draft: Here’s yet another team that leans college and safe up top — and then gets bolder as it goes down the board.

Best fits: For pick 47, I think the Cubs will be looking at East Carolina LHP Carson Whisenhunt, Arkansas RHP Peyton Pallette, and Oklahoma LHP Jake Bennett, while prep CF Henry Bolte makes sense for an upside bet.

Past five first-round picks: LHP Jordan Wicks (2021); SS Ed Howard (2020); RHP Ryan Jensen (2019); SS Nico Hoerner (2018); LHP Brendon Little (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 8 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 19 ($179 million)

Biggest system strengths: Starting pitching depth

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: The Twins had a streak of taking corner power bats at high picks (Alex Kirilloff, Trevor Larnach, Matt Wallner, Aaron Sabato), but they have shifted a bit recently to be more focused on specific traits — like pitchers with high arm slots or stuff with well-differentiated shapes and position players with more defensive value.

Best fits: At picks 48 and 68, I see position player fits in prep C Brady Neal, LSU 3B Cade Doughty and Stanford CF Brock Jones. If they opt for pitching, it could be one of Mississippi State RHP Landon Sims, Missouri JC RHP Jacob Misiorowski or Cal Poly RHP Drew Thorpe.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Chase Petty (2021); 1B Aaron Sabato (2020); SS Keoni Cavaco (2019); OF Matt Wallner (2019); OF Trevor Larnach (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 9 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 25 ($129 million)

Biggest system strengths: Pitching depth

Biggest system needs: Shortstop

How they typically draft: K.C. is right there with San Diego as the boldest drafting teams, both for taking on risk with high-upside types and prep pitchers early in the draft and also in aggressively moving money around at high picks.

Best fits: The Royals are at the top of the second tier of talent with their pick at ninth overall, with prep CF Justin Crawford coming up as a hot name that fits their type. At pick 49, I could see them pairing Crawford with a safer college type like Georgia RHP Jonathan Cannon, Florida LHP Hunter Barco or Florida State LHP Parker Messick.

Past five first-round picks: LHP Frank Mozzicato (2021); LHP Asa Lacy (2020); SS Bobby Witt Jr. (2019); RHP Brady Singer (2018); RHP Jackson Kowar (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 10 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 15 ($202 million)

Biggest system strengths: Every-day position players

Biggest system needs: Impact pitching

How they typically draft: For years, the Rockies have taken sinkerballers exclusively among pitchers and tended to lean toward up-the-middle prep bats among position players.

Best fits: Like the Royals before them, the Rockies are at an awkward point of the draft where nobody (probably the Rockies included) knows what they’re going to do with their first pick. I think the Rockies’ preferences for what to do at picks 31, 38 and 50 might influence how they handle pick 10.

I could see these players as targets at those comp/second-round picks: Arkansas 3B Cayden Wallace, Gonzaga RHP Gabriel Hughes, prep CF Henry Bolte, prep RHP Walter Ford and Georgia RHP Jonathan Cannon.

Past five first-round picks: OF Benny Montgomery (2021); OF Zac Veen (2020); 1B Michael Toglia (2019); LHP Ryan Rolison (2018); 1B Grant Lavigne (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 11 overall (Mets also have the No. 14 pick as compensation for unsigned 2021 first-rounder Kumar Rocker)

Where their farm system ranks: No. 8 ($254 million)

Biggest system strengths: Upper minors position players

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: The Mets have targeted prep talents and high-upside players with high picks for years, normally with pretty solid results.

Best fits: I think they’re a landing spot for a sliding CF Elijah Green or going underslot on a deal with CF Justin Crawford in Round 1. High schoolers RHP Dylan Lesko and SS Jett Williams also are both rumored, as is Vanderbilt RF Spencer Jones.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Kumar Rucker (2021); OF Pete Crow-Armstrong (2020); 3B Brett Baty (2019); OF Jarred Kelenic (2018); LHP David Peterson (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 12 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 17 ($197 million)

Biggest system strengths: Up-the-middle position players

Biggest system needs: Starting pitching

How they typically draft: The Tigers aren’t scared to take a prep pitcher; they also love arm speed and especially love SEC performance. In contrast to some of the more progressive clubs, the Tigers lean upside/risk at higher picks and play it safer with college types at later picks.

Best fits: I think the Tigers are steering away from prep arms this year at No. 12 overall, and the board is giving them college bats, mostly. At pick 51, I could see them taking an upside swing with prep CF Henry Bolte, prep RHP Walter Ford, prep SS Mikey Romero or SEC arms who recently underwent Tommy John in Mississippi State RHP Landon Sims or Florida LHP Hunter Barco.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Jackson Jobe (2021); 1B Spencer Torkelson (2020); OF Riley Greene (2019); RHP Casey Mize (2018); RHP Alex Faedo (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 13 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 29 ($58 million)

Biggest system strengths: Young position players

Biggest system needs: Starting pitching depth

How they typically draft: In the first draft under general manager Perry Minasian, the Angels took all pitchers last year, and the rumors are that they might do close to the same thing again this year.

Best fits: They’re kicking the tires on prep pitching (Brandon Barriera, Robby Snelling, Dylan Lesko) and also the underslot college pitching (Kumar Rocker, Reggie Crawford, Gabriel Hughes).

Past five first-round picks: RHP Sam Bachman (2021); LHP Reid Detmers (2020); SS Will Wilson (2019); OF Jordyn Adams (2018); OF Jo Adell (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 15 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 14 ($214 million)

Biggest system strengths: Up-the-middle position players

Biggest system needs: Starting pitching

How they typically draft: Bold in every sense of the word: constantly going way over or under slot, taking risky upside types.

Best fits: Kumar Rocker, Dylan Lesko, Justin Crawford, Brandon Barriera and Jett Williams; and just think of other upside guys you like, as they probably fit too.

Past five first-round picks: SS Jackson Merrill (2021); OF Robert Hassell (2020); SS CJ Abrams (2019); LHP Ryan Weathers (2018); SS Xavier Edwards (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 16 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 1 ($300 million)

Biggest system strengths: Potential every-day hitters

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: Lean to upside at higher picks and then take seemingly boring college arms one after another — and a few of them will immediately gain 3 mph in pro ball for some reason.

Best fits: Cooper Hjerpe fits the trendy low slot/not a sinker-with-feel type that Cleveland is on board with drafting. The high-contact hitters like Zach Neto and Drew Gilbert also fit. On the upside end of things, Cole Young and Jett Williams also fit.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Gavin Williams (2021); SS Carson Tucker (2020); RHP Daniel Espino (2019); C Bo Naylor (2018); RHP Ethan Hankins (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 17 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 23 ($158 million)

Biggest system strengths: Upside power arms

Biggest system needs: Power bats

How they typically draft: Over the past two years, the Phils have dropped their hand into the riskiest bucket in the draft-prep righties who already throw pretty hard — and have hit the jackpot with both: Andrew Painter and Mick Abel.

Best fits: They’re rumored to be considering that again, tied to all of the top prep arms: Brandon Barriera the most but also Dylan Lesko, Brock Porter and Robby Snelling.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Andrew Painter (2021); RHP Mick Abel (2020); SS Bryson Stott (2019); 3B Alec Bohm (2018); OF Adam Haseley (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 18 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 21 ($175 million)

Biggest system strengths: Up-the-middle position players

Biggest system needs: Impact pitching

How they typically draft: Like the Padres, the Reds lean upside throughout the draft, and they’re in a good spot in the middle of the first round and with extra picks to take a swing on that sort of player.

Best fits: Prep pitchers Dylan Lesko, Jacob Miller and Jackson Ferris, Vanderbilt RF Spencer Jones, prep CF Justin Crawford, Tennessee RF Jordan Beck

Past five first-round picks: SS Matt McLain (2021); OF Jay Allen (2021); OF Austin Hendrick (2020); LHP Nick Lodolo (2019); 3B Jonathan India (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 19 overall

Where their farm system ranks: N0. 20 ($176 million)

Biggest system strengths: Potential lineup regulars

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: The A’s had a fantastic draft last year in which they took the best available prep position player, and then they kept picking underrated college players. They tend to zig where others zag and don’t always hew closely to public rankings.

Best fits: Tennessee CF Drew Gilbert and Oklahoma State RHP Justin Campbell have been rumored for a while, with Arizona C Daniel Susac and Oregon State CF Jacob Melton also logical fits.

Past five first-round picks: SS Max Muncy (2021); C Tyler Soderstrom (2020); SS Logan Davidson (2019); OF Kyler Murray (2018); OF Austin Beck (2017); SS Kevin Merrell (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 20 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 30 ($53 million)

Biggest system strengths: Starting pitching depth

Biggest system needs: Impact talent

How they typically draft: The Braves look for savings and safer college guys up top and then spend the money later — usually spreading it around on multiple prep players.

Best fits: The heavy rumors are underslot college pitching at their first pick, with Oklahoma State RHP Jacob Campbell, Campbell RHP Thomas Harrington, Georgia RHP Jonathan Cannon, Gonzaga RHP Gabriel Hughes and Tennessee RHP Blade Tidwell all prominent.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Ryan Cusick (2021); LHP Jared Shuster (2020); C Shea Langeliers (2019); SS Braden Shewmake (2019); RHP Carter Stewart (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 21 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 22 ($160 million)

Biggest system strengths: High-upside talent

Biggest system needs: Upper minors position players

How they typically draft: They’ve had some success of late with prep position players like Harry Ford and Edwin Arroyo from last year’s draft, so they might steer more toward that this year. But I’d expect a college player with the top pick.

Best fits: Alabama LHP Connor Prielipp, Oregon State CF Jacob Melton, Oklahoma State RHP Justin Campbell, Gonzaga RHP Gabriel Hughes and prep SS Jett Williams (one of the more polished in the prep class) all make sense.

Past five first-round picks: C Harry Ford (2021); RHP Emerson Hancock (2020); RHP George Kirby (2019); RHP Logan Gilbert (2018); 1B Evan White (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 22 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 13 ($219 million)

Biggest system strengths: Impact position players

Biggest system needs: Upper minors outfielders

How they typically draft: The Cards have been sneaky productive — among the best in the league — over the past few drafts. They’ll take upside prep types when they feel strongly and otherwise do well selecting safer college types with whom development has always excelled.

Best fits: I could see them cleaning up what’s left of the top of the college pitching class (Connor Prielipp, Cooper Hjerpe, Cade Horton) or scooping up a sliding prep position player (Jett Williams, Tucker Toman, Justin Crawford, Cole Young), but the board is giving them college hitters — who should fly off the board around this area of the draft.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Michael McGreevy (2021); 3B Jordan Walker (2020); LHP Zack Thompson (2019); 3B Nolan Gorman (2018); RHP Griffin Roberts (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 23 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 18 ($192 million)

Biggest system strengths: High-upside infielders

Biggest system needs: Impact pitching

How they typically draft: The Jays have leaned college up top recently (and traded their past two top picks) then opened it up to include more upside at later picks.

Best fits: They’ve been tied to mostly position players, including prep 3B Tucker Toman, Campbell SS Zach Neto, prep SS Cole Young and Arizona C Daniel Susac, but I could see them having a pitcher they’re eyeing here like Cooper Hjerpe.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Gunnar Hoglund (2021); INF Austin Martin (2020); RHP Alek Manoah (2019); SS Jordan Groshans (2018); SS Logan Warmoth (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 24 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 10 ($235 million)

Biggest system strengths: Up-the-middle position players

Biggest system needs: Impact starting pitchers

How they typically draft: Under the Chaim Bloom regime, they’ve leaned toward hit-first middle infielders in Nick Yorke and Marcelo Mayer. At later picks, they’ve focused on prospects with a standout tool or two.

Best fits: If some of the premium hit-first guys get to the Red Sox (Zach Neto, Jace Jung, Jett Williams, Cole Young, Drew Gilbert, Daniel Susac), I think they stop here.

Past five first-round picks: SS Marcelo Mayer (2021); 2B Nick Yorke (2020); 3B Triston Casas (2018); RHP Tanner Houck (2017); LHP Jay Groome (2016)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 25 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 3 ($290 million)

Biggest system strengths: Up-the-middle position players

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: The Yankees are open-minded on demographics of players (college or prep; pitcher or hitter) and have some specific ideas about what they consider upside. They tend toward up-the-middle position players and pitchers with a standout quality or two that their development can work with.

Best fits: There are some college players who fit the Yankees’ type, including LHP Cooper Hjerpe, RF Spencer Jones and RF Jordan Beck, while some less likely options are prep RHP Jacob Miller, Oregon State CF Jacob Melton and Florida RF Sterlin Thompson.

Past five first-round picks: SS Trey Sweeney (2021); C Austin Wells (2020); SS Anthony Volpe (2019); LHP T.J. Sikkema (2019); C Anthony Seigler (2018)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 26 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 28 ($61 million)

Biggest system strengths: Lower minors upside

Biggest system needs: Upper minors pitching

How they typically draft: For a while, the White Sox went with lower-upside college power bats (Andrew Vaughn, Zack Collins, Gavin Sheets, Jake Burger) and then followed it with upside prep arms (Jared Kelley, Matthew Thompson, Andrew Dalquist). But after picking later last year, they changed course and took prep hitters with their first two picks.

Best fits: Picking late in the first again, I think there will be enough overslot options for their second pick, especially considering the prep and injured pitching talent, that the White Sox will lean to established college pitching here: Gabriel Hughes, Justin Campbell, Jake Bennett, Thomas Harrington, Landon Sims, Jonathan Cannon and Blade Tidwell.

Past five first-round picks: INF Colson Montgomery (2021); LHP Garrett Crochet (2020); 1B Andrew Vaughn (2019); SS Nick Madrigal (2018); 3B Jake Burger (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 27 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 24 ($136 million)

Biggest system strengths: Up-the-middle position players

Biggest system needs: Starting pitching

How they typically draft: The Brewers have leaned heavily toward position players the past few drafts, to great effect, while focusing more on high contact rates.

Best fits: Drew Gilbert and Chase DeLauter fit them to a T. Eric Brown is a swing-change candidate with a similar profile. Peyton Pallette, in particular, and Carson Whisenhunt fit their pitching type.

Past five first-round picks: CF Sal Frelick (2021); CF Garrett Mitchell (2020); LHP Ethan Small (2019); SS Brice Turang (2018); 2B Keston Hiura (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 28 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 27 ($80 million)

Biggest system strengths: Upper minors depth

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: They’ve had limited high picks of late due to their sign-stealing punishment. Houston has leaned into finding guys with a standout tool or two to try to find some upside outside of the top picks.

Best fits: At 28th overall, I’d expect them to clean up the leftovers of the deep college class. Spencer Jones certainly fits the standout tool type, while Chase DeLauter, Dylan Beavers and Jacob Melton are a little more well-rounded. Keep an eye on Dalton Rushing in this range too.

Past five first-round picks: C Korey Lee (2019); OF Seth Beer (2018); RHP J.B. Bukauskas (2017); RHP Forrest Whitley (2016); SS Alex Bregman (2015)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 29 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 4 ($291 million)

Biggest system strengths: Every-day player depth

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: The Rays don’t mind taking a prep pitcher up high, but they’re also open-minded enough to take any sort of player — with a Yankees-like approach on standout tools that fit their development type.

Best fits: Vanderbilt RF Spencer Jones was a guy they liked for a big bonus out of high school three years ago, while RHPs Owen Murphy and Jacob Miller along with LHP Robby Snelling seem to fit their preferred types of high school arms. Dylan Beavers and Sterlin Thompson also make some sense.

Past five first-round picks: SS Carson Williams (2021); RHP Nick Bitsko (2020); SS Greg Jones (2019); RHP JJ Goss (2019); RHP Seth Johnson (2019)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 30 overall

Where their farm system ranks: No. 12 ($224 million)

Biggest system strengths: Position player upside

Biggest system needs: Contact hitters

How they typically draft: The Giants have leaned toward college up top the past few years, and then they have mixed in some overslot prep pitchers later on.

Best fits: Again, many similar college names here as some other picks in this range: Spencer Jones, Dylan Beavers, Jacob Melton, Eric Brown, Sterlin Thompson and Cayden Wallace. I could see Peyton Pallette fitting on the pitching side.

Past five first-round picks: RHP Will Bednar (2021); C Patrick Bailey (2020); OF Hunter Bishop (2019); C Joey Bart (2018); OF Heliot Ramos (2017)


First 2022 MLB draft pick: No. 40 overall (the Dodgers’ first pick drops 10 spots due to exceeding the competitive balance tax threshold)

Where their farm system ranks: No. 6 ($285 million)

Biggest system strengths: Upside position players

Biggest system needs: Left-handed pitching

How they typically draft: The Dodgers have leaned heavily toward pitching over the past few years — and to great effect. They also are one of the best clubs at hitter development, particularly in teaching hitters to tap into their raw power

Best fits: Coastal Carolina SS Eric Brown is a perfect fit for their hitting philosophy, while juco RHP Jacob Misiorowski is a likely reliever but also fits their pitching approach almost perfectly. Prep catchers Brady Neal and Malcolm Moore fit the bill, as does Walker Buehler-style RHP Peyton Pallette.

Past five first-round picks: LHP Maddux Bruns (2021); RHP Bobby Miller (2020); 3B Kody Hoese (2019); 2B Michael Busch (2019); RHP J.T. Ginn (2018)



Source by [author_name]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Post